Anxiety Related Disorders On The Rise In Children

Helping Children with Anxiety About COVID-19 - Children's Health

We are constantly bombarded with information and instant news in this digital age, which is frequently skewed and exaggerated. A quick scan of online news and social media reveals the abundance of unpleasant stuff. All of this has inevitably resulted in far higher levels of fear over our own and family’s safety.

Youngsters are aware of this information, so it is unsurprising that there is a considerably higher level of worry in children now than in previous generations. While all children experience worry about numerous things during their growing up stages, they usually overcome it as they get older. Recent studies, however, have revealed a significant increase in the prevalence of anxiety and related problems in children, and parents and guardians should not dismiss the issue.

What is anxiety?

Anxiety is a type of stress that mostly involves worrying about what might happen, such as worrying about things going wrong or feeling in danger. As a result, anxiety is a common human reaction that acts as a “important response” function. Although distinguishing between normal anxiety and anxiety-related disorders is often difficult, if you suspect that your child’s anxieties are preventing him or her from leading a normal life, you should get help.

Simple signs to watch for

While children will confide in their small anxieties or worries, which can be addressed by consoling the child, keep a look out for the following indications, which may suggest a more serious problem.

  1. Excessive worry about things in general or any specific issue for a long time.
  2. Trouble sleeping at night or sleepiness during the day.
  3. Restlessness or fatigue during waking hours.
  4. Trouble concentrating.
  5. Irritability.
  6. Continuously trying a to avoid a situation.

What can anxiety lead to?

Childre with higher levels of anxiety can develop anxiety related disorders, the following are some of the conditions that may develop.

  1. General anxiety disorder.
  2. Obsessive compulsive disorders.
  3. Phobias(excessive fear of a certain event/ situation)
  4. Depression
  5. Low self-esteem

How can parents help the child?

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While children will confide in their small anxieties or worries, which can be addressed by consoling the child, keep a look out for the following indications, which may suggest a more serious problem:

  1. Set a good example- It’s crucial for adults to avoid displaying extreme anxiety or terror in front of children, or discussing exaggerated circumstances. Maintain an optimistic attitude. Positive energy rapidly spreads and rubs off.
  2. Set a good example- It’s crucial for adults to avoid displaying extreme anxiety or terror in front of children, or discussing exaggerated circumstances. Maintain an optimistic attitude. Positive energy rapidly spreads and rubs off.
  3. Simple exercises can be done with your youngster. For example, whenever the child expresses heightened anxiety, ask the youngster to write down his or her concern and then watch to see if the circumstance occurs. When the youngster realises that the negative event did not occur, the worry begins to fade.
  4. Keep an eye on your child’s anxiety. If you believe your situation hasn’t improved or has worsened, don’t be afraid to seek expert care.

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