THE BOYS- REVIEW

I was a bit apprehensive at first by just seeing that the premise of this show was based on superheroes. I didn’t think that they would have the budget to deliver the level of VFX that Marvel and DC have been managing to. Although they get around this issue by spacing out action set pieces and largely constraining to hand to hand combat when they do get to the larger action scenes involving computer effects and stunt coordination they are able to deliver on a large scale.

In many ways, this did not feel like a TV show at all. It felt like an 8-hour movie that was just split into 8 halves. There are no instances where the show seemed to drag for the purpose of producing more episodes, it did not also pander to less interesting side characters to pass the time. The whole show seems very cohesive and consistent with the logic in its universe. It also adroitly uses its soundtrack at appropriate places only when it is necessary. The show also manages to balance humor and its dark tone quite well.

I found this show extremely mature, not only in the sense of its visual presentation which is extremely gory and ultra-violent but also in terms of the ideas and themes it is trying to convey. It touches on many topics like religion, fame, capitalism, nihilism, and loss. All these ideas are eloquently carried out throughout the show in such a way that they do not impede the actual story development. The color pallet of this show is also very dark and grainy, which I am not always a fan of but it actually works here because unlike other films or shows who use their R rating unwittingly and sporadically, this one uses it with the purpose to show the reality of the world.

By far my favorite aspect of this show is its characters. Every character in this show has multiple dimensions. They are not just completely evil or noble, even some of our main characters have questionable morals. They all have a strong background and motivation and they definitely do justice in further developing these characters as the season moves along. I found the character of Billy Butcher, played by Karl Urban, the most interesting. This is because several aspects of his life are lightly alluded throughout the season, making the audience want to know more about this character.

I know this is not the first of its kind to make a show about morally compromised heroes but it is also a lot more than that. It has a lot to say about society and huge cooperations running our lives. It just uses superheroes as a medium to convey all those ideas. My only gripe with this show is its plot convenience and misplaced exposition. I strongly recommend checking it out.

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